Washington, DC Politics — September 3, 2013 at 8:51 pm

Norton Tribute to Muriel Siebert first woman on NYSE to go into the Congressional Record

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                    Contact: Daniel van Hoogstraten
         August 28, 2013                                                                                        o: 202-225-8050
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Norton Tribute to Muriel Siebert first woman on NYSE to go into the Congressional Record
The Office of Congresswomen Eleanor Holmes Norton released her remembrance of Muriel Siebert, the first woman to buy a New York Stock Exchange seat, and Norton’s friend.  Siebert, Norton and two other women founded the New York Women’s Forum to counter the “old boys network”.  Norton will enter her remembrance into the Congressional record on September 9th, the day Congress returns from recess.
In her Congressional Record statement Norton said, “Muriel Siebert was a legendary figure on the New York Stock Exchange who took her path-breaking success in the financial services industry beyond her personal success to help other women enter the male-dominated financial sector and become leaders in business.  Norton’s full statement follows.
STATEMENT OF HON. ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON
OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

 

Ms. Norton.  Mr. Speaker,
I rise today to ask the House of Representatives to join me in honoring Muriel Siebert, the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), a trailblazing champion of gender equality who has inspired hundreds of women to pursue careers in business and finance.  She passed away on August 24, 2013.
              Born in Cleveland in 1928, Muriel Siebert, also known as “Mickie,” moved to New York when she was 22 with only $500 and ambition to pursue a business career.   Muriel began her career as a trainee in research at Bache & Co. and an industry specialist in airlines and aerospace.  However, Muriel Siebert, tired of being paid less for doing the same work as her male counterparts, established her own investment firm, Muriel Siebert & Company.  In 1967, the same year she started her investment firm, and only 13 years after her arrival to New York, Muriel Siebert became the first woman to buy a seat on the New York Stock Exchange.  In 1977, she took a leave of absence from her firm to become the first female superintendent of banking for New York State’s troubled banking system.
              After five years of outstanding public service and successfully leading restructuring efforts of the New York’s banking system, Muriel Siebert ran for the U.S. Senate, in 1982, narrowly losing in the Republican primary.   Determined to continue her lifelong work as a feminist leader, Muriel Siebert donated millions of dollars of her own money to help level the playing field for women owned business.
I met Muriel when I was Chair of the New York City Commission on Human Rights.  The two Muriels, Muriel Siebert and Muriel Fox, and the two Eleanors, Eleanor Guggenheimer and I, founded the New York Women’s Forum to give prominent women a way to counter the “old-boys” network and to help women achieve greater equality and success.   Muriel was also the president of the New York Women’s Agenda, where she developed a personal finance program to improve the financial literacy of young people, which is still part of the New York Public School System.
Muriel Siebert was a legendary figure on the New York Stock Exchange who took her path-breaking success in the financial services industry beyond her personal success to help other women enter the male-dominated financial sector and become leaders in business.
Mr. Speaker, I ask the House to join me in honoring Muriel Siebert as a pioneer for women on the New York Stock Exchange and for a life of inspiring women to enter and achieve in business and finance.
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